Hidden Gems from Week 1

Denard Robinson set a new career low against Alabama in one respect.

These are some random notes from Week 1 that you may not have noticed or picked up on.

Alabama: The longest rush the Tide defense allowed Denard Robinson to have was nine yards. It was the first time in his starting career that he hasn't had a rush of at least 10 yards.

Arkansas: Tyler Wilson's 221.2 passing efficiency mark on the game was the first time he's gone over 200 in his career. He's come within 20 twice before: a 193.5 in last year's opener against Missouri State and a 182.6 in relief of Ryan Mallett against eventual national champ Auburn in 2010.

Auburn: AU allowed 320 rushing yards against Clemson. Its track record in allowing over 300 yards rushing is decidedly mixed and only needs a blowout win to hit for the cycle. They also allowed 333 to Mississippi State in a close 41-34 win and 304 to Georgia in a 45-7 blowout loss last year.

Florida: Three different coordinators in three different years have thus far yielded very similar results at quarterback. Jeff Driskel and Jacoby Brissett combined for a 62% completion rate at 6.91 yards per attempt. Last year's starter John Brantley completed passes at a 60% rate for 8.52 yards per attempt, and in 2010 he had a 61% completion rate for 6.26 yards per attempt. Post-Tebow starting quarterbacks have been consistent in completing a decent number of passes for a terrible average.

Georgia: Buffalo's Alex Zordich had a great day running the ball from the quarterback spot with 89 yards on 12 carries for a 7.42 YPC rate (no sacks included). UGA will need to lock that down with the much more talented James Franklin coming up next.

Kentucky: The Wildcat defense allowed three scoring drives of at least 80 yards to Louisville (99, 85, and 93 yards). The last time the UK offense did that was against Ole Miss last year (80, 80, and 85 yards).

LSU: The Tigers had 508 total yards in their win over North Texas. The last time LSU rolled up over 500 yards of offense was against Louisiana Tech on November 10, 2007.

Ole Miss: Bo Wallace threw for an average of 11 yards per attempt against Central Arkansas. The Rebels only had a quarterback throw for more than 10 yards an attempt twice last year: against Fresno State and Georgia, and both times by Randall Mackey.

Mississippi State: Dan Mullen has faced four I-AA opponents in his career as a head coach. Against two of them, Alcorn State and Tennessee-Martin, he's run up at least 560 total yards. The other two have held him to under 400 yards, and both were Jackson State (in 2009 and 2012).

Missouri: James Franklin had 6.5 yards per carry versus just 6.2 yards per pass. It was the third time in his starting career that he's rushed for a better average than he's passed after last year's opener against Miami University (5.1 rush/5.0 pass) and last year's bowl against UNC (7.9 rush/5.7 pass).

South Carolina: Marcus Lattimore was back to his hard-running self with 110 yards on 23 carries, but he still lacks an explosive burst. His longest run against Vanderbilt was 29 yards, which is good but not outstanding. In fact, he has only five rushes of more than 30 yards in his 435 carries to date.

Tennessee: The Vols' 22-point first quarter was the first time UT had score more than 20 in a quarter since putting up 21 in the first frame against Ole Miss in 2010. The last time they scored more than that 21 points in a quarter was the previous week in 2010 when they had a 27-point second quarter against Memphis.

Vanderbilt: The Commodores only allowed 272 total yards in the loss to South Carolina. The last time they allowed that few yards and still lost was the 2009 loss to Army in which they allowed just 269 yards.

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